Maintain positive health in the winter – Let’s do it!

MAINTAIN POSITIVE HEALTH IN THE WINTER – LET’S DO IT!

I wrote this post with people who live in parts of the world, where winter is cold, gloomy and bleak in mind. During the winter months, this is the time of year where many are susceptible to being the unhealthiest. While summer yielded endless days of blazing hot sunshine, women unveiled their bikini ready bodies whilst the men displayed their ripped physique.

The impact of summer on health

Summer is the quintessential time for putting our best foot forward. Our clothing shifts into a direction where the entire body is accentuated or exposed. It is also a time of year where people are more body conscious, be it comparing ourselves to the latest hot celebrity or observing the body type of our male or female counterpart(s). This combination of image awareness, soaring temperature and determination to look flawless enforces the notion of optimising good health.

From a psychological aspect, our emotional state elevates during the summer time. We have a tendency to be more sociable, do outdoor activities and frolic. In other words, we become much more motivated. I find it amazing how people (myself included) manage to accomplish more during the sunny days. Continue reading

Vegetarians and Vegans Don’t Live Longer, They Just Miss Out on Juicy Steaks

Grilled Wagyu Beef Steak

Are you missing out on Grilled Wagyu Beef Steaks for nothing?
image by Vichaya Kiatying-Angsulee

Did you know that a number of vegetarian and vegan websites promote health benefits of such diets through shoddy research like the one below?

In a research by Seventh Day Adventists published on the The Wall Street Journal here it is claimed that in a period of 6 years a diet study was conducted on 70,000 people. The researchers claim that “male vegetarians have a 12% lower chance of dying than meat-eaters”

However people who actually ate fish and even ate meat occasionally were added to the vegetarian group. When you take the fish-eaters and occasional meat-eaters and put them back to the meat-eating group, there is actually no difference in the life expectancy of vegetarians vs. meat-eaters. Continue reading

How You Can Beat the Evil Food Industry

Food Babe, Vani Hari looking at food labels.

We all complain and worry about not really knowing what is in our food. We may be slowly creating cancers in our own bodies without knowing. If I asked you what you think the solution is, most of you would reply that there is nothing much to do. I would have given the same answer a few weeks ago. But all that changed after I met the woman of my dreams.

Here’s the thing; you would be dead-wrong if you believed that there is nothing you can do. The average Joe/Jane like you and I wouldn’t know where to start but the woman of my dreams does. She is the woman of my dreams because she has given me a voice to take on the food industry. Continue reading

Should there be a tax on junk food but subsidies on healthy food?

The tobacco industry claims that the purchase of cigarettes has fallen worldwide since heavy taxation and advertising restrictions have been implemented. The idea of taxing junk food in the same way as tobacco and subsidizing healthy food is a combination that could guide people to choosing healthier food (which will be cheaper after subsidizing) instead of the poisonous junk food (which today is way cheaper than healthy food but will be more expensive after taxation). In the long run, billions spent on healthcare due to the outcome of an unhealthy diet can be put to better use.

couple eating healthy food

Should the government subsidize healthy food…
photo by Ambro

Those who oppose this idea claim that the government and the food companies are two different entities. Adjusting food prices will interfere with the free market and create a false economy. In fact the term “junk food” lacks a consensus on its definition. Some perceive junk food as anything that is processed, others define junk food as food that has certain sugar content or that contains preservatives. Same goes for how people define healthy food; is being organic good enough or does diet soda also fit the category?

Youngsters eating junk food

… and tax Junk food?
photo by Ambro

Update:

Turkey Sorrel Soup

Seasonal Healthy Eating: Turkey Sorrel Soup.

 

turkey sorrel soup

I often hear that people say soups are not a part of healthy or clean eating. Why not? It all depends on the way you cook a soup. If you add fatty pork meat as a base, lots of simple carbs (pasta or potatoes) and processed soup flavoring, then yes, it might turn out not that healthy at all. If we talk about canned soups, then definitely, this is not a healthy addition to your diet. Otherwise, soups that are based on relatively lean meat and filled with veggies create a wonderful way to stay satisfied for longer with no harm to your waistline.

Turkey sorrel soup is an example of a simple and healthy soup. Plus, it is a seasonal meal. Sorrel gives a tart taste to it. In combination with Greek yogurt, despite the fact you eat a hot meal, sorrel gives you a feeling of refreshment. Exactly what you need in during summer time.

When it comes to nutrients, sorrel is rich in vitamins C (immune system), B6 , A (eyesight), and minerals, iron (energy level), magnesium and potassium (blood pressure). Sorrel is also rich in fiber, which helps prevent diarrhea, constipation, bloating, or cramping.

Warning: sorrel contains oxalic acid. For sensitive individuals, high-oxalate diets have been linked to an increased risk of kidney stones.

  • Servings: ”8″
  • Difficulty: ”easy”
  • Print

Turkey Sorrel Soup 2TS

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 turkey wing
  • 3-4 liter of water
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 medium carrot, shredded
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp rice, soaked in water
  • 4 cups of chopped sorrel
  • boiled eggs and Greek yogurt for serving

 

Instructions:

  1. Rinse turkey wing under cold running water. Put it in a pot with water. Cook on medium heat. Add salt to taste.
  2. Add oil to a heated skillet. Add shredded carrot and chopped onion. Add salt and pepper to taste. Cook until golden and soft, mixing up occasionally. Set aside when ready.
  3. Check on water in the pot. You might want to collect brown foam that appears on top. In about 45-50 minutes (counting from start), add carrot and onion mixture. Then, add soaked rice. Cook for another 10-15 minutes.
  4. Rinse sorrel if needed. Chop it. Add to the soup. Cook for another 1-2 minutes. Then, add chopped greens. Taste to see if more salt or pepper needed.
  5. Add sliced boiled egg and 1-2 Tbsp Greek yogurt, before serving.

 

Nutrition facts per portion:


 

Turkey Sorrel Soup 3TS

Calories: 117

Fat: 4 g

Carbs: 3 g

Protein: 15 g

 

Nutrition facts per portion when 1 boiled egg and 1 Tbsp Greek yogurt have been added:


 

turkey sorrel soup

Calories: 227

Fat: 12 g

Carbs: 5 g

Protein: 24 g

 

 

 


Mariya Korolishyna is an  ISSA certified fitness nutritionist. Born in Ukraine, the 36 years old is addicted to running and healthy lifestyle.

good food bad food

Food Is NOT the Enemy, Self-Bullying Is!

I want to talk to you about food. For many of you, food creates tension, confusion, love/hate, pleasure, guilt, shame, and secrecy.However, food is never the enemy.
 cooking food

Society Is to Blame

Food is neither good or bad but we as a society have assigned moral values to food. So what happens is that when you eat a food, you believe is “bad”, then you consciously and unconsciously see yourself as a bad person for eating that food.

society
Yes, there is scientific research that states that specific foods are “good” for you and other kinds of foods are “bad” for you because of their nutritional profile. However, I invite you to be a food scientist, and rather than seeing things as good or bad, to ask yourself: ‘Does this food serve me or not?’

Good Food Versus Bad Food -You Decide

healthy fruit saladThe best educator if a food is going to serve you or not is you and your body! To determine if a food serves you or not ask yourself the following questions before you eat the food (as a baseline), and right after you eat the food, two hours after you eat it, and the next morning.
  1. How are my energy levels? Low, moderate, or high?
  2. How is my mental clarity? Do I have brain fog or am I able to focus and concentrate? Is my mental clarity sharp?
  3. How is my mood: irritable, stable, or angry?  (note: Not the same as how you are feeling about eating that food because your answer will always be guilt).
  4. How is my digestive health: bloated, clear, or constipated?
  5. How did I sleep last night?
Track these questions every time you eat your “forbidden food”. You will see if there are actually negative effects on your inner health. Do not focus so much on what you think and know about the food  based on what you have learned about it from outside resources. Be a food scientist and use yourself as the subject.

People React Differently to Food

good and bad foodHow certain food affects one person may have a very different effect on another person. For example, my husband can eat granola and not have sugar hangover, whereas for me, when I have granola (in appropriate serving size), my belly starts to hurt and my head starts to spin. So if I choose to eat granola, I make it a conscious decision that I am also choosing to accept the consequences. That means I will not beat myself up for enjoying it and experiencing the negative effects on my body afterwards. I take it for what it is and move on.
You may be surprised to learn that what you thought was bad for you, may actually not have any negative impact on you. Sometimes, however, it may confirm that it does! Ultimately, this is how you can start neutralizing your food and stop seeing food as good or bad.
Food is not the enemy…bullying yourself is!
Food is just food.  You can change your story. You can change the way you respond to food, regardless of what it is.
I’d love to hear from you about how your food scientist experience is! 🙂 What did you learn?

Want to get more high-value insights about how to discover Freedom With Food, Body Love Confidence and Being Your Own Best Friend? 

Sign up and receive my FREE E-Guide “8 Ways to Cope with Stress & Manage Cravings” here

Rosalyn Fung The ZeitRosalyn Fung is a Registered Psychologist & Founder of Holistic Body Love. She is a wellness speaker, consultant, mentor, writer & blogger. Roz specializes in Holistic Nutritional Psychology in which she empowers people in their relationship with food, body image, weight, as well as digestion, fatigue, immunity and mood.

Her approach is a combination of eating psychology, positive psychology, mindfulness, neuroscience, family systems and nutritional therapy. She’s the go-to person to help you understand how to feel normal around food, and break-free from body image and weight struggles.

Follow Rosalyn on Facebook at Rosalyn Fung Holistic Body Love-Psychologist

Twitter: @RosalynFung

Instagram: @holisticbodylove

Blog: Pausitivity 

Mashed and Riced Cauliflower

I Mashed and Riced Cauliflower – This Is What Happened!

Mashing cauliflowerFinding alternative uses for vegetables keeps your taste buds guessing, and boosts your nutrition!  Cauliflower contains sulforaphane, which acts as an antioxidant and helps detox your system utilizing enzymes. Cruciferous vegetables are believed to lower risk of cancer due to these beneficial sulforaphanes.

Ricing or mashing cauliflower allows you to mold the flavors you desire while still tasting like a traditional comfort food.  Tweak this recipe by adding your own preferences for spice level and ingredients.  Enjoy with beef, roast chicken, or baked halibut.

Ingredients:

-1 large head of cauliflower. Rinse, pat dry, and chop into florets, discarding the thick core.
-I rinsed can BPA free garbanzo beans (I prefer to use organically)
-1 cup low-sodium chicken stock. You can use vegetable stock if you prefer.
-olive oil cooking spray (or avocado oil cooking spray)
-8 oz brown button mushrooms, sliced
-1 yellow onion, chopped
-3 garlic cloves, rinsed
-1/4 sea salt or Kosher salt
-1/4 tsp fresh ground pepper
-2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
-11/2 ounce Pecorino Romano cheese (divided)
-1/2 cup chopped parsley (flat or curly- be sure to wash)
– 3 tsp olive oil (I prefer a flavored oil such as Mediterranean or basil olive oil)
*For more spice, add red pepper flakes in addition to the pepper, or sub a Chipotle olive oil instead of plain or flavored oil.  You can also add fresh thyme and reduce the parsley by that same amount

How To Cook:

Ricing Cauliflower

1. Divide cauliflower into 2-3 sections. Add chopped cauliflower into the food processor one at a time. Pulse until the pieces are the size of rice.  Transfer to a large bowl and continue process till it’s all ‘riced’.

2. In a blender, add rinsed beans and chicken stock. Process until smooth.

3. Add chosen cooking spray to a pan and heat on medium heat. Add cleaned mushrooms and onions. Cook for 5-7 minutes stirring often, till they are lightly browned. Add chopped garlic, salt & pepper and cook 1 minute. Add the lemon juice, increase the heat to medium-high and cook, stirring occasionally until liquid has evaporated.

4.  Pour blended bean broth purée into the pan. Gently fold till it’s well mixed, cover and cook over medium for 10 minutes.  Stir occasionally.

5. Uncover and reduce heat to low. Stir in 1/2 ounce cheese. Turn off heat and stir in parsley.  Divide portions amount plates. Drizzle with oil and remaining cheese.

Serving-1 1/2 cups cauliflower
Calories-240,  Total Fat-15g, Sodium- 180mg


I began Paula’s HealthyLiving.com to share my passion for staying fit, eating healthy and scheduling rest time.  As a 50 year old mother of 3, I understand that it can be difficult to make healthy meals, exercise and carve out time for you, while constantly doing this juggling act called, life!

Breakfast Sandwich Recipe

Buttery Ginger Amaranth Avocado Open-Faced Breakfast Sandwich

DSC_0047e

When it comes to breakfast, anything goes around here. One thing that is for sure is that great breakfast should be  balanced. Ever since I have taken a keen study on amaranth, I have discovered great health benefits. Amaranth is among a few vegetables that have complete protein. And since amaranth is a super vegetable, it is only rightful that it is served for the greatest meal of the day—breakfast. This sandwich is a combination of sweet salty, buttery, creamy nutty spicy flavours and textures. This is a perfectly balanced sandwich to assemble in no time.

What you will need:

1 Loaf of sweet bread, sliced

10 Handfuls of amaranth, Washed and drained

3 Avocadoes

Butter/margarine

¼C. Roasted sesame seeds

½ Tsp. Ginger, finely chopped

½ Tsp. Cooking oil

¼ C. Coconut flakes

Honey or olive oil for drizzling

A pinch of salt

Method

Spread butter on both sides of the slices of the bread. Heat a non-stick pan and grill the slices of bread till soft and moist with crunchy edges. Set the slices aside. In the same pan, add the cooking oil and let it get hot. Add the ginger. Once the ginger has released an aroma browned a little, add the amaranth. Keep stirring. The amaranth will release water. Cover the pan and let it cook for a short while in its juices. Remove the lid and add salt. Keep stirring. The amaranth will turn a bright green color when fully cooked but with a crunch. Remove from fire. To assemble the sandwich, arrange the amaranth on top of the bread slices. Peel the avocados and finely slice them. Arrange them on top of the amaranth. Generously sprinkle sesame seeds. Sprinkle with salt and coconut flakes. Finally, drizzle with olive oil (for a more savory taste) or honey (for a sweeter taste). Serve with your favourite beverage. Continue reading

carrot cake overnight oatmeal

Carrot Cake Overnight Oatmeal

 Carrot Cake Overnight Oatmeal

When I was about 17 years old, I found in one of my mom’s books a recipe, which said, “Beauty Oatmeal from France” in its headline. A very simple recipe that promises you to look your best by eating overnight oatmeal. The instructions were simple; add boiled water to oats in the evening eat them the next morning. Not so exciting right? The best things in life are usually the simplest.

I liked the simplicity of the recipe and for years, ‘Beauty Oatmeal’ has been one of my favorite breakfast options. Sometimes, I would add shredded apple, honey, and cinnamon to enrich the taste.

Now, almost twenty years later, I still enjoy my overnight oatmeal but with a few delicious twists. I have to thank my profession as fitness nutritionist for that. I’ve added healthy fats, such as chia seeds and nuts, and I’ve added protein – Greek yogurt. Now I have a complete meal that is rich in fiber, has balanced macronutrients, and tastes delicious. Oh, did I mention, it takes only 10 minutes to make.

I hope, you’ll like the overnight oatmeal option I am going to offer you today. This carrot cake version came accidentally one day when I used some shredded carrots instead of apple. My husband said that breakfast that day reminded him of carrot cake. I guess, a lot of wonderful ideas in cooking come by accident.

Continue reading

Cauliflower and Sausage Casserole Recipe

This yummy casserole tastes like comfort food, but without the guilt.
Kale is a nutritional powerhouse, filled with calcium, and numerous vitamins and minerals.
Servings: 6
cauliflower casserole

Here’s what you need for this awesome casserole:Cauliflower shreded

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 yellow onion, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3 cups kale, chopped
  • dash of salt and pepper
  • pinch of each, dried: thyme, rosemary, tarragon, and parsley
  • 4 links nitrate-free, chicken sausage, sliced into half moons
  • 1 head cauliflower, cut into small florets
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 cup fat-free ricotta cheese
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded and divided

Here’s how you prepare this awesome casserole:

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Lightly grease a casserole dish with olive oil. Place a large pot of water to boil with a pinch of salt.
  2. In a large skillet, over medium heat, sauté the olive oil, onion, garlic, salt and pepper, dried herbs and chicken sausage. Mix well, and then add kale. Cover for about 3 minutes, until kale gets bright green and wilted. Then remove the cover. Sauté for an additional 3 minutes until everything is tender. Set aside.
  3. Place the cauliflower florets in the pot of boiling water. Boil for 5 minutes, then remove from heat, drain, and return cauliflower to pot.
  4. Add the kale mixture to the pot as well as the chicken broth, lemon juice, ricotta cheese and half of the Parmesan cheese. Mix over medium heat until all has been incorporated.
  5. Transfer to prepared casserole dish. Top with remaining Parmesan cheese. Cover with foil and bake for 15 minutes. Remove foil and bake for an additional 5 minutes.
  6. Remove from oven and serve.

Nutritional Analysis Cauliflower and Sausage Casserole

One serving equals: 238 calories, 10g fat, 584mg sodium, 14g carbohydrate, 4g fiber, and 18g protein
From Trisha DeHall- Fit Body Bootcamp Newsletter

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